LeapFish: Fastest Search Engine

Update: Leapfish stopped being a search engine and stopped offering domain name appraisals at the beginning of 2008.

leapfish
LeapFish, a multi-dimensional search engine, qualifies as my pick for the ‘fastest search engine’ title. LeapFish has recently introduced their click-free search.

That’s right, go on over to LeapFish and try it for yourself. The LeapFish technology, click-free search, shows you the search results as you type. You no longer have to hit the “enter” key on your keyboard to see the search results. For many, including myself, the click-free technology actually speeds up searches.

Let’s look at an example. I went over to LeapFish.com and entered my name, “Bill Hartzer”. By the time I had finished typing in my name I had the search results. Now that’s fast:

leapfish search results

With this click-free technology, LeapFish is attempting to push search to 2.0. They are trying to say, literally: “out with the search button.” LeapFish’s click-free search interface gives us a fast, fluid and dynamic search experience that takes the search results data from major online sites like Google, YouTube, Ebay and combines them into a single search query. Consolidating a knowledge base of relevancy and variety from major online authorities, LeapFish effectively renders more comprehensive results than those returned by its providers.

According to LeapFish, the inspiration behind their search engine has “been the opportunity to provide an answer to the information overload and the fragmentation of accessibility that is naturally occurring online today. If relevancy, the currently defined search formula, continues to be limited by the virtual real estate allotted by page 1 of the major search engines, then the variety and accessibility of the breadth of the web is being lost in the information overload. LeapFish works to capture this variety in a new multidimensional, and now instantaneous, click-free search interface.”

Even though the search results come up quicker than any other search engine today, the click-free search is actually pretty complex. It uses proprietary hyper-threading technology to communicate with a growing list of over 200 online authorities, currently under development, to deliver more than just relevancy to users. LeapFish launched its search platform in November 2008 and is currently seeking patents for its new offering.

Take LeapFish for a spin right now, try it for yourself, and let me know if you think that LeapFish really is the fastest search engine. I bet you’ll agree. Enter your search phrase in the area below.

::Form removed::

Update: Leapfish stopped being a search engine and stopped offering domain name appraisals at the beginning of 2008.

Comments

  1. MB says

    Leapfish is a cool concept site, but it’s entirely not scalable and not really a search engine.

    I’m sure Google would implement ajax-type search technology if it were feasible, but the cost is simply far too great – each search now actually results in 3, 5, even 15 or more searches, most of which are completely wasted.

    If leapfish takes off, do you think Google will keep allowing them the massive abuse of their servers? Not a chance. Same with Yahoo and MSN – it’s only saving grace is it’s relative obscurity…

  2. Marcus Lindley says

    This is definitely an interesting twist on search engine results – I can imagine that many of the big search engines will probably be looking to implement similar technology. It is fast – and I like the fact that you don’t have retype your search term when toggling between the search engines. Kind of like DogPile or AllTheWeb – but better.

  3. Internet Marketing Agency says

    I just tried it; it’s pretty awesome. But I think I’ll keep using Google!

  4. Commercial coffe grinder says

    I know there will be lag for slower connections but is there a set time limit that it waits to search. Also, do I understand this correctly? It takes data from SERP’s from other search engines like google and yahoo and then uses that information to determine relevancy?

  5. fava says

    I find the constant flashing as I type to be very distracting. Combined with the fact that it is simply repackaged google search I really don’t see any practical use for it.

  6. Ali says

    If leapfish takes off, do you think Google will keep allowing them the massive abuse of their servers? Not a chance. Same with Yahoo and MSN – it’s only saving grace is it’s relative obscurity…

  7. Mike Willson says

    Leapfish is basically a simple website site where you can search the web and quickly switch between the results from Yahoo, MSN and Google. Leapfish has a cool features just like Bing that loads videos quickly but from what I can tell Bing is much better. Leapfish also pulls data from Yelp, Amazon, Ebay and a few other sites as you search. I cannot see any reason why this website is going to be popular because it just does not have much to offer. Leapfish generates money by selling advertising similar to other search sites. A telemarketer from Leapfish called me and said that Leapfish was partnered up with Google, Yahoo, and MSN. The Leapfish sales person tried to manipulate me into thinking that he could put my company on top of all the search engines. The Leapfish sales people use high pressure techniques over the phone to make you think that you have to buy specific key words before the advertising spots sell out. The sales guy I talked to on the phone claimed that he could not even tell me how many times my key word was actually searched. I looked up the company’s web traffic and quickly realized that Leapfish is a scam. If no one really uses Leapfish, then the keywords are worthless. Please beware, this company tries to sell useless advertising spots to unsuspecting business owners over the phone.

    Take Care,

    Mike

    “Before you speak, listen. Before you write, think. Before you spend, earn. Before you invest, investigate. Before you criticize, wait. Before you pray, forgive. Before you quit, try. Before you retire, save. Before you die, give.”
    W. Edwards Deming